Colin Kaepernick: The National Anthem,Afro American Athletes and Activism

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OK I’m gonna weigh in on Kap’s passive aggressive protest against the systemic oppression this country has at best ignored & at its worst consistently perpetrated.

I remember back in the 90’s being at my cousins basketball game in rural Kentucky & the pledge of allegiance started up. I’d recently came into knowledge of self & my Black consciousness so I found my self having a crisis of conscience. Do I hold fast to my principles & beliefs & refuse to stand or sing the anthem of a country responsible for flooding my community with narcotics & guns? Or do I give in to the peer pressure I feel from a family full of vets & an uberly patriotic conservative community?

Well I didn’t stand & I’m thinking I’m about to get stink eye from the whole gymnasium. (Or worse from all them country White folk) Well no body paid attention to my small passive aggressive protest. I now laugh about how caught up I was in “not giving in to the man“ & caring about what those people thought about me.

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Saying the “Pledge of Allegiance” is seen as almost a religious obligation by much of main stream America

It just wasn’t that serious …at least that’s the way it seemed back then. The fact #Gabby‘s perceived slight & #Colin‘s purposeful protest have been responded to by some so violently points to the increased racial tensions in America. In fact White athletes doing the same or similar actions seem to go unnoticed by the same angry patriots that attacked Gabby.

Three Olympic national anthems, no hands over hearts — but only Gabby Douglas draws outrage

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Gabby Douglas was harassed and even threatened on social media after she was perceived as being unpatriotic for not placing her hand over her heart during the nation Anthem

This is one reason I respect #Kaepernick all the more. Its not easy doing or not doing something millions of people will literally hate you for. He’s using his status to bring more attention to an issue that should be tackled by our government. America’s inaction is complicity.

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Athletes that are brave enough to take a solid stance on serious issues can find themselves ostracized

Like so many other issues in Black America your finding some of our own people jumping up to condemn Kap. This just points to how confused some of us are on the issue of systemic police violence & our governments role in it. Many of us dont understand the connection (and or are in full blown uncle Tom mode) so you hear certain rappers saying #alllivesmatter & others saying we should ignore police murdering Blacks because of inner city gang violence. This is like saying we should ignore the fact Sugar corporations caused the diabetes epidemic simply because Americans have a problem with eating to much.

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You had so called “non oppressed Blacks” like Allen B. West taking it upon themselves to chastise Colin Kaepernick for expressing his right to free speech

Also Black folk have just wanted to belong in this country for so long I think in an attempt to “fit in“ with mainstream America some of us attack those of us who speak truth to power. Colin has risked finances & his career by making this statement. Not an easy thing to do & far from cowardly. More of today’s sports stars need to take a stand against racism in all its forms.

 

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Tommy Smith and John Carlos’s Black Power salute during the 1968 Olympics was one of the most iconic moments in sports history

 

Bill Russell, Muhammad Ali, Jim Brown, Lew Alcindor, Carl Stokes, Walter Beach, Bobby Mitchell, Sid Williams, Curtis McClinton, Willie Davis, Jim Shorter, and John Wooten

Former Cleveland Browns Hall of Fame running back Jim Brown presides over a meeting of top African-American athletes who supported boxer Muhammad Ali’s refusal to fight in Vietnam on June 4, 1967. Pictured: (front row) Bill Russell, Muhammad Ali, Jim Brown, Lew Alcindor; (back row) Carl Stokes, Walter Beach, Bobby Mitchell, Sid Williams, Curtis McClinton, Willie Davis, Jim Shorter, and John Wooten. (AP Photo/Tony Tomsic)

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The Los Angeles Lakers made a “team” protest by wearing “I Cant Breathe” t-shirts after the murder of Eric Garner by NYPD

Yeah Colin pissed a lot of people off but instead of being mad at his protest be mad at the reason the protest was necessary -#Cipher

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